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OET Speaking and Writing Vocabulary: Symptoms

Inadequate communication between doctors and patients but also between clinicians as patients transition across venues of care, carries substantial risks. At the time of discharge for instance, changes in medications may occur, abnormal or pending test results, and evolving aspects of the patient’s condition, all of which need to receive appropriate attention. The essential nature of timely and accurate communication of any changes like these is easily observable at all times and clinical competence to achieve this, plays a key role in effective decision making and treatment plans.


The OET Speaking and Writing subtests both require a host of vocabulary to precisely communicate patient symptoms and complaints and this is the same pool of words required in physicians’ daily practice.


Here are some of the commonly used words to talk about symptoms. Please note that some seemingly simple and well known words will undergo certain changes in form (adjective to noun, verb to noun) depending on the lexical context. Special attention should be paid to these as they tend to cause the main issues when building proper accuracy.

eg. Have you been experiencing drowsiness. weakness or tiredness?

Have you been feeling drowsy, weak or tired?

Mr. Smith reported feeling drowsy, tired and weak.

Mr. Smith complained of drowsiness, weakness and tiredness )


Some frequently used words to talk about symptoms include:


cramping

burning

drowsiness

tiredness

weakness heartburn

increased thirst

indigestion

light-colored stools

loss of appetite

loss of consciousness

muscle cramping

weakness

muscle tremors

nausea

vomiting

nervousness

numbness

tingling

restlessness

swelling

weight gain

irritability

dullness

dizziness

belching

flatulence


You can find the extended list in the printable pdf file below.


Symptoms Vocabulary
.pdf
Download PDF • 92KB


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